Full Body Human Anatomy

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Find a great range of the diagram of human body and anatomy diagrams in the following pictures. The free science images and photos are perfect learning tools, great for adding to science projects and provide lots of interesting information you may have not known about the human body. Check out pictures and diagram related to bones, organs, senses, muscles and much more. Learn more about human anatomy with these free resources. Just click on the pictures to enlarge and save it. Scroll down to see the diagrams!


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Our bodies consist of a number of biological systems that carry out specific functions necessary for everyday living. Basically, the human body is made up of 11 organ systems that work with one another. These systems include the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, urinary system, and reproductive systems. In the diagrams below, you can see each detail of the human anatomy.

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Different organs can work together to perform a common function, like how the parts of your digestive system break down food. We refer to an integrated unit as an organ system. Groups of organ systems work together to make complete, functional organisms, like us! There are 11 major organ systems in the human body, which include the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, nervous and endocrine systems. The immune, integumentary, skeletal, muscle and reproductive systems are also part of the human body.

Full Body Human Anatomy

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The human body is everything that makes up, well, you. The basic parts of the human body are the head, neck, torso, arms and legs. This makes the knowledge about human body is just as important as anything. So, explore the human body with various diagram of human body with the description of objects in the body like never before!


Learning Objectives

  • Describe the structure of the human body in terms of six levels of organization
  • List the eleven organ systems of the human body and identify at least one organ and one major function of each

Before you begin to study the different structures and functions of the human body, it is helpful to consider its basic architecture; that is, how its smallest parts are assembled into larger structures. It is convenient to consider the structures of the body in terms of fundamental levels of organization that increase in complexity: subatomic particles, atoms, molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms and biosphere (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Levels of Structural Organization of the Human Body. The organization of the body often is discussed in terms of six distinct levels of increasing complexity, from the smallest chemical building blocks to a unique human organism.

Diagram Of The Human Body

The Levels of Organization

Full Body Anatomy Picture

To study the chemical level of organization, scientists consider the simplest building blocks of matter: subatomic particles, atoms and molecules. All matter in the universe is composed of one or more unique pure substances called elements, familiar examples of which are hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, calcium, and iron. The smallest unit of any of these pure substances (elements) is an atom. Atoms are made up of subatomic particles such as the proton, electron and neutron. Two or more atoms combine to form a molecule, such as the water molecules, proteins, and sugars found in living things. Molecules are the chemical building blocks of all body structures.

A cell is the smallest independently functioning unit of a living organism. Even bacteria, which are extremely small, independently-living organisms, have a cellular structure. Each bacterium is a single cell. All living structures of human anatomy contain cells, and almost all functions of human physiology are performed in cells or are initiated by cells.

Full Body Human Anatomy

A human cell typically consists of flexible membranes that enclose cytoplasm, a water-based cellular fluid together with a variety of tiny functioning units called organelles. In humans, as in all organisms, cells perform all functions of life. A tissue is a group of many similar cells (though sometimes composed of a few related types) that work together to perform a specific function. An organ is an anatomically distinct structure of the body composed of two or more tissue types. Each organ performs one or more specific physiological functions. An organ system is a group of organs that work together to perform major functions or meet physiological needs of the body.

This book covers eleven distinct organ systems in the human body (Figure 2 and Figure 3). Assigning organs to organ systems can be imprecise since organs that “belong” to one system can also have functions integral to another system. In fact, most organs contribute to more than one system.

Figure 2. Organ Systems of the Human Body. Organs that work together are grouped into organ systems.

Full Body Diagram Human Anatomy

Figure 3. Organ Systems of the Human Body (continued). Organs that work together are grouped into organ systems. The organism level is the highest level of organization. An organism is a living being that has a cellular structure and that can independently perform all physiologic functions necessary for life. In multicellular organisms, including humans, all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the body work together to maintain the life and health of the organism.